G.O.A.T. Food

Medical News Today analyses the Tom Brady diet, also known as the the TB12 Method:

“The Tom Brady diet is a blend of other dietary regimens, such as anti-inflammatory, alkaline, and Mediterranean. It consists of 20% lean meat or wild-caught fish, while the remaining 80% comprises mainly fruit and vegetables, as well as whole grains and legumes….

“There are no obvious risks to this diet. However, as it is quite restrictive, someone may find it difficult to commit to the TB12 Method over the long term.”

Tats and Wraps

The Memphis Flyer profiles Ian and Tay Brown, a couple who opened a health food kitchen inside a tattoo parlor:

“‘That’s something I came up with,’ says [Ian]. ‘Because in all the years I’ve been tattooing, tattoo artists probably eat just very, very bad. I wanted to provide us with something to keep the blood flowing, the mind sharp—low-calorie super foods that keep us going.'”

Going Digital

Farmers markets in Oregon are embracing e-commerce in response to COVID-19, reports KTVZ:

“Farmers markets are an excellent source of local Oregon food, and while most remain open in their physical locations, many markets have responded to consumer demand by also adding online pre-order systems for their shoppers. This is an opportunity for consumers to support local businesses and preserve the farmers market industry, which serves communities across the state.”

Takes the Cake

Costco has stopped selling half-sheet cakes—the latest in a series of COVID-19-related disruptions—and is encouraging shoppers to buy 10-inch round cakes instead.

“‘To help limit personal contact and create more space for social distancing, Costco has reduced service in some departments,’ the company explained to outraged customers on its Facebook account. In a statement to the New York Times, Costco said it has no plans to immediately bring back the half-sheet cakes and said the round cakes are ‘resonating with our members.'”

Not Just for St. Patrick’s Day

Cabbage has become more popular with the coronavirus, reports Naomi Tomky:

“Packed with fiber and nutrients, cabbage climbed to the top of lockdown cooking popularity for the most utterly mundane reason: practicality. Cabbage lasts basically forever in the fridge, costs almost nothing and works just as well as a star centerpiece of a main dish or shredded and cooked down to near invisibility.”

Burnin’

Epicurious’s Joe Sevier explains the appeal of charred food:

“Burning foods on purpose is nothing new. In classic French cuisine, stocks are often started by cutting an onion in half and then searing the exposed flesh until the surface is totally black. The blackened onion then goes into the pot with roasted animal bones and other aromatics to simmer away. When I was in culinary school, we learned that this was a key component of a certain type of dark stock: the blackened onion not only adds flavor, imparting a subtle bitterness that offsets the sweet taste of carrots, tomato paste, and whatever else might be in the stock. It also lends a rich color, which makes the stock look more appealing.”

New Heights

Epicurious’s Kendra Vaculin explains how she uses old cookbooks to prop up her desk computer:

“Building a cookbook standing desk (or laptop lift, if I’m feeling sedentary) has done wonders for my productivity during this new WFH era. After weeks of wondering why I couldn’t focus while curled on the couch in a position called The Chiropractor’s Nightmare, balancing my computer on a little pile of culinary inspiration was enough to set me straight.”

Skin Deep

Want glowing skin? Try using superfoods, writes Laura Pitcher:

“You might think your skincare routine starts with a simple cleanser, but many nutritionists would argue that it starts with what you eat. ‘What you put in your body literally becomes your skin,’ says holistic nutritionist Afya Ibomu. As a result, kitchen ingredients are gradually becoming beauty staples, with a rising interest in superfoods in particular.”

Pigging Out

Julie Kendrick recent bought half a pig from a local organic farm. There were challenges beyond the budget hit:

“When I pick up my three 12-by-18-inch boxes of processed meat, I’ll need to cram them all into the basement freezer and hope I still have some space for my autumn garden harvest (not to mention ice cubes). Then, over the long winter, I’ll need to stay up-to-date on my inventory and cook it all wisely and well. According to the farm, a typical half-pig purchase includes 8 to 10 pounds of pork chops, three roasts, two quarter hams, 10 to 14 pounds of bacon, three pounds of ribs and 15 pounds of ground meat.”

Junk-Food Jump

Sales of processed food have shot up since the COVID-19 crisis hit, writes Katie Way:

“It’s easy, though, to chalk spiking processed food sales up to slovenly millennials pigging out, mere hypocrites who nagged their parents about the benefits of clean eating and buying organic only to crawl back into the arms of boxed mac and cheese when the going gets tough. It’s much less amusing to consider that maybe the prospect of being jobless and hopelessly in debt for the foreseeable future influenced people’s decisions to grab canned soup instead of fresh produce.”